Building Oregon

Elk Lake Guard Station (Bend, Oregon)

Title
Elk Lake Guard Station (Bend, Oregon)
LC Subject
Architecture, American Architecture--United States
Description
National Register of Historic Places (Listed, 2009)
View
National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
Provenance
University of Oregon Libraries
Temporal
1920-1929
Work Type
architecture (object genre) built works views (visual works) exterior views log cabins (houses) Log buildings plans (orthographic projections) floor-plan drawings
Location
City of Bend >> Oregon >> West >> United States Elk Lake Guard Station >> Deschutes County >> Oregon >> West >> United States Deschutes County >> Oregon >> West >> United States Oregon >> West >> United States United States
Street Address
Fort Rock Road
Date
1929
View Date
2002-10
Identifier
Deschutes_ElkLakeGuardStation.pdf
Rights
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Rights Holder
University of Oregon
Type
Image
Format
application/pdf
Set
Building Oregon
Primary Set
Building Oregon
Is Part Of
Elk Lake Guard Station (Bend, Oregon)
Institution
University of Oregon
Citation
National Register of Historic Places Registration Form National Register of Historic Places, http://www.nps.gov/nr
Note
In 1929, employees of the U.S. Forest Service built the Elk Lake Guard Station, described as a “simple cabin” made of logs with a wood-shingle roof. The station is historically important as an early example of the Forest Service’s current management polices that emphasize both recreation and natural resource conservation. In the early-twentieth century Guard Stations were constructed in remote areas as outposts to protect timber, water, wildlife, and fish. At Elk Lake, increasing public recreation led to the construction of a guard station to both protect natural resources and serve visitors. To meet the agency’s goals, the facility was sited to allow for maximum contact between Forest Service personnel and forest users while still allowing backcountry access to the soon-to-be designated Three Sisters Primitive Area. The station was one of the agency’s first efforts to standardize building appearance and its design represents the desire to construct buildings that complemented the natural environment. Source: Oregon State Historic Preservation Office