Building Oregon

Santiam Wagon Road (Sisters, Oregon)

Title
Santiam Wagon Road (Sisters, Oregon)
LC Subject
Architecture, American Architecture--United States
Creator
Willamette Valley and Cascade Mountain Wagon Road Company
Creator Display
Willamette Valley and Cascade Mountain Wagon Road Company (builder/contractor)
Description
National Register of Historic Places (Listed, 2010)
View
Segment 6, Contributing [House Rock Management Segment]. Linn County.
Temporal
1860-1869 1920-1919
Work Type
architecture (object genre) built works views (visual works) exterior views open spaces site (location) roads
Location
Cascadia >> Linn County Sisters >> Deschutes County >> Oregon >> West >> United States Linn County Deschutes County >> Oregon >> West >> United States Oregon >> West >> United States United States
Date
1866/1920
View Date
2010
Identifier
pna_21834
Rights
Educational Use Permitted
Rights Holder
Oregon State Historic Preservation Office
Source
Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, http://www.oregon.gov/OPRD/HCD/SHPO/
Type
Image
Format
image/tiff
Set
Building Oregon
Primary Set
Building Oregon
Is Part Of
Willamette National Forest (Oregon); Deschutes National Forest (Oregon)
Institution
University of Oregon
Note
Officially opened in 1866, the Santiam Wagon Road was listed in the National Register for its role in helping to connect Oregon’s two disparate sections, the Willamette Valley in the west and the Deschutes River Basin in the east, by providing a primary means of transportation across the central Cascade Mountains from the mid-nineteenth through early twentieth centuries. The Santiam Wagon Road helped contribute to the economic development on both the east and west sides of the Cascade Mountains by providing a more reliable route to facilitate trade, commerce, and communication. The road also helped shape the settlement patterns of central Oregon, as former Willamette Valley residents made the journey east to establish new homes, ranches, farms, and businesses. The Santiam Wagon Road served as an important transportation link in Oregon for over 50 years before becoming largely obsolete with the completion and opening of the modern McKenzie Highway (OR 242) in 1920. Source: SHPO. This image was included in the documentation to support a nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, a program of the National Park Service. The image is provided here by the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and the University of Oregon Libraries to facilitate scholarship, research, and teaching. For other uses, such as publication, contact the State Historic Preservation Office. Please credit the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office when using this image.